Tag Archives: UNICEF

Yemen conflict comes at great cost to civilians: UN envoy

A man from the city of Sa’ada, sits outside his tent in the Dharwan settlement outside Yemen’s capital Sana’a. He fled with his eight sons to the temporary settlement after his house was destroyed by Yemen’s devastating conflict. Photo: UNHCR/Mohammed Hamoud

21 February 2017 – United Nations Radio

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The escalation of conflict and militarization of Yemen’s Western Coast is coming at a great cost to civilians, the humanitarian coordinator in the country, Jamie McGoldrick, has warned.

Fighting and displacement have mainly been concentrated in Al Mukha and Al Dhubab districts in Taizz governorate.

Since the beginning of the conflict in March 2015, some three million people have been forced to flee their homes for safety, according to UN estimates.

Jocelyne Sambira reports.

UN humanitarian coordinator Jamie McGoldrick issued a statement on Tuesday expressing concern over the recent flare-up of fighting in Yemen and its impact on the ongoing food crisis.

Over 17 million people in Yemen are currently unable to adequately feed themselves and are frequently forced to skip meals, he said.

Seven million Yemenis don’t know where their next meal will come from and are even closer to starvation, he added.

Meanwhile, the UN refugee agency (UNHCR) and the International Organization for Migration (IOM) also issued a warning following the release of the latest data on the country’s displacement crisis.

Prolonged hostilities and worsening conditions are now forcing one million of those uprooted to return to the homes they fled, despite the danger and insecurity across the country, the agencies said.

On a more positive note, health authorities in Yemen launched a nationwide polio immunization campaign on Monday with the help of the World Health Organization (WHO) and the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF).

More than 5 million children under the age of five are expected to get the vaccine, according to WHO’s Christian Lindemeir.

“More than 40,000 health workers are taking part in the 3 day campaign and that involves more than 5,000 vehicles that had to be rented. The campaign started in all governorates except Sa’ada which is in the northwest where it will take place next week and will be combined with measles and rubella measles campaign due to the measles outbreak there.”

Mr Lindemeir said the last immunization campaign was in 2016. 

Jocelyne Sambira, United Nations.

‘Time running out’ for 1.4 million children in ‘man-made’ crises in Africa, Yemen – UNICEF

An 11-month-old child having his arm cirmeasured at a health centre at the Banki IDP camp in Borno state, northeast Nigeria. Photo: UNICEF/EsieboF

21 February 2017

Almost 1.4 million children are at imminent risk of death due to severe acute malnutrition this year, as famine threatens in Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan and Yemen, warned the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), urging prompt action to save them.

“We can still save many lives. The severe malnutrition and looming famine are largely man-made,” said UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake in a news release issued by the UN agency today.

“Our common humanity demands faster action,” he underscored.

According to UNICEF, as many as 462,000 children in Yemen – where a conflict has been raging for the past two years – are currently suffering from severe acute malnutrition. This figure has risen nearly 200 per cent since 2014.

Similarly, in conflict affected parts of northeast Nigeria, including Adamawa, Borno and Yobi, the number of children with severe acute malnutrition is expected to reach 450,000. According to a famine early warning system, the famine likely occurred in some previously inaccessible areas of Borno, and it is likely ongoing, and will continue, in other areas which remain beyond humanitarian reach.

Furthermore, in Somalia, droughts threaten an already fragile population battered by decades of conflict: almost half the population (6.2 million people) faces acute food insecurity and is in need of urgent relief, 185,000 among them children suffering from severe acute malnutrition. There are fears that the number could rise to 270,000 in the next few months.

In South Sudan, a famine was recently declared in parts of the country, adding to a humanitarian situation already complicated due to poverty and insecurity. Over 270,000 children are severely malnourished in the country and the total number of food insecure people across the country is expected to rise once the lean season sets in.

Yemen’s children ‘locked in a vicious cycle of violence, loss and uncertainty,’ UN warns

A six-year-old boy gets water from this water point in Musaik, a neighbourhood of Sana'a. Photo: OCHA/Charlotte Cans

A six-year-old boy gets water from this water point in Musaik, a neighbourhood of Sana’a. Photo: OCHA/Charlotte Cans

29 March 2016

Six children are killed or injured every day and children as young as 10 years old are recruited to fight in conflict-torn Yemen, according to a United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) report, which also underscored that child recruitment has risen exponentially during the fighting and that the country is at risk of becoming a failed State.

The report, Children on the Brink, highlights the heavy toll that the violence in Yemen is having on children and the deterioration in an already precarious humanitarian situation.

UNICEF verified more than 1,560 incidents of grave violations again children in Yemen. As a result, more than 900 children were killed and more than 1,300 were injured in the past year alone. On average, at least six children have been killed or injured every day.

These numbers are almost seven times higher than the whole of 2014, the report notes. With more than 50 verified attacks on schools, children were also killed while attending school or on their way to or from school. These numbers represent the tip of the iceberg as they only indicate the cases that UNICEF was able to verify.

“Children are paying the highest price for a conflict not of their making,” UNICEF Country Representative Julien Harneis said in a press release. “They have been killed or maimed across the country and are no longer safe anywhere in Yemen. Even playing or sleeping has become dangerous.”

Recruitment of children in fighting

As the war escalates, the recruitment and use of children in the fighting continues to increase, the report warns. Children are taking up much more active roles in the fighting, such as manning checkpoints and carrying weapons. In the past year, UNICEF verified 848 cases of child recruitment; parties to the conflict have recruited children as young as 10 years old into the fighting.

The latest data shows that 63 health facilities have been attacked or damaged and most have reported severe shortages in medical equipment, supplies and personnel, along with sporadic electricity.

Deaths from lack of medical services

UNICEF also estimates that nearly 10,000 additional deaths from preventable diseases may have occurred among children under five years old in the past year as a result of the decline in critical health services including immunization and the treatment of diarrhoea and pneumonia. This figure is in addition to the nearly 40,000 children who die every year in Yemen before their fifth birthday.

Nearly 10 million children or 80 per cent of the country’s total population of children are now in need of urgent humanitarian assistance. More than two million children face the threat of diarrhoeal diseases and 320,000 are at risk of severe acute malnutrition.

“We need to speed up the delivery of humanitarian assistance and continue to save lives as well as children’s dreams of growing up and acquiring an education,” Harneis said. “It’s a race against time.”

To date, UNICEF has received only 18 per cent of its $180 million funding requirements for 2016.

UNICEF reiterates its call on all parties to the conflict to put an end to the fighting in Yemen and reach a political settlement.

“Yemen was already a fragile state due to decades of underdevelopment and intermittent conflicts,” said Peter Salama, UNICEF’s Regional Director for the Middle East and North Africa. “Sadly, children always bear the brunt. Without an end to the war, the country now risks becoming a failed state, with far-reaching and long-term consequences for children and their families.”

Yemen: as cyclone weakens, UN warns more than 1 million people could be impacted by flooding

Cyclone Chapala damaged or destroyed hundreds of homes in Yemen. Photo: UNICEF Yemen/Ahmed Tani

Cyclone Chapala damaged or destroyed hundreds of homes in Yemen. Photo: UNICEF Yemen/Ahmed Tani

4 November 2015

While the United Nations is reporting that Cyclone Chapala – the rare tropical storm that slammed into Yemen’s southern coast yesterday, dumping perhaps a year’s worth of rain in some areas – is expected to weaken to a tropical depression over the next 12 hours, the immediate concern remains the welfare of an estimated 1 million people, mainly in the two governorates of Shabwah and Hadramaut.

“The UN and its partners are using all available routes into the affected areas to deliver assistance: from Aden as the principle dispatch hub and Sana’a as an alternate; and from Djibouti by sea and from the east from Oman by road and sea,” UN Spokesperson Stéphane Dujarric told reporters in New York.

He also said that the World Health Organization (WHO) has provided 20,000 litres of diesel fuel to eight hospitals in Mukallah – the country’s fifth largest city – and 2,500 litres of petrol for 16 ambulances.

The UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and WHO surveillance rapid response teams are also being deployed and a WHO shipment by sea with an additional 18.3 metric tonnes of medical supplies and reproductive health kits is also being deployed from Djibouti to Aden.

Meanwhile, three deaths and 34 injuries were reported earlier by the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

Cyclone Chapala made landfall in Yemen while fighting between the Government and rebel Houthi forces in the country continues. Since March 2015, the crisis has been an all-out conflict, with a military operation launched by a coalition led by Saudi Arabia.

Armed conflict has spread rapidly across much of the country, with devastating consequences for civilians. Partners now estimate that 21.1 million people – 80 per cent of the population – require some form of humanitarian protection or assistance. This represents a 33 per cent increase in needs since the conflict began, says OCHA.

The UN relief wing’s most recent update notes that the storm’s impact will be most severe in Shabwah and Hadramaut governorates. “These two governorates have a combined population of about 1.9 million people, 76 per cent (1.4 million) of whom are already in need of humanitarian assistance according to the 2015 Yemen Humanitarian Needs Overview.”

“Initial reports suggest more than 40,000 people displaced or temporarily evacuated from coastal areas and at least 450 homes damaged or destroyed,” OCHA said in the update.

Based on reports from Socotra, three people died and nine were injured in the flooding. At the same, some 20,000 people were reportedly evacuated from coastal areas, and close to 400 homes have been destroyed. Officials in Shabwah also reported that 6,000 people had moved to higher ground to avoid anticipated flooding and potential rock falls.

“Meteorologists forecast the Chapala will weaken as it continues north-west towards the capital Sana’a,” notes the update, adding that “sustained winds of 118 km/h are expected and the trailing edge of the storm system will continue to bring heavy precipitation to coastal areas for the next 24 to 48 hours.”

According to OCHA, UN Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) has prepositioned stocks and has launched a response to the severe impact in Yemen. “A number of different aid delivery routes into the affected areas are being utilized.” HCT indicated that in the report.

The HCT has primarily been moving supplies from existing stockpiles in Aden along the coastal roads to Mukalla. They will use supplies from the Humanitarian Response Depot (HRD) in Dubai and the UN Disaster Assessment and Coordination Team (UNDAC) in Oman to the coastal area.

Statement by UNICEF Executive Director Anthony Lake on attack on health facility in Yemen

NEW YORK, 27 October 2015

The health facility reportedly attacked today in Saada, Yemen, is the 39th health centre hit since the violence escalated in March. Critical shortages of fuel, medications, electricity, petrol and water threaten to stop many more from operating.

“More children in Yemen may well die from a lack of medicines and healthcare than from bullets and bombs. The threat of preventable diseases is acute and the number of children at risk of the deadliest form of malnutrition has tripled to more than half a million.

“Across the country, 10 million children require humanitarian aid. Once again, we appeal to all of those involved to respect international humanitarian law and to bring an end to this tragedy.”

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About UNICEF
UNICEF promotes the rights and wellbeing of every child, in everything we do. Together with our partners, we work in 190 countries and territories to translate that commitment into practical action, focusing special effort on reaching the most vulnerable and excluded children, to the benefit of all children, everywhere. For more information about UNICEF and its work visit: www.unicef.org

Download multimedia content at: http://weshare.unicef.org/mediaresources

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook

For further information please contact:

Rajat Madhok, UNICEF Yemen, +967 71 222 3001, +962 79 827 0912, rmadhok@unicef.org

Simon Ingram, UNICEF Regional Office for the Middle East and North Africa, +962 79 590 4740, singram@unicef.org

Najwa Mekki, UNICEF New York, +1 917 209 1804, nmekki@unicef.org

More than half a million children now risk ‘severe malnutrition’ in Yemen – UNICEF

Faisal, 18 months old is treated for severe acute malnutrition at Sabeen hospital in Yemen’s capital Sana’a. Photo: UNICEF/UMI191723/Yasin

Faisal, 18 months old is treated for severe acute malnutrition at Sabeen hospital in Yemen’s capital Sana’a. Photo: UNICEF/UMI191723/Yasin

16 October 2015

Yemen’s spiralling crisis has caused “alarming malnutrition levels” among children because of the limited availability of and lack of access to food due to blocked or damaged delivery routes and restrictions on food and fuel imports caused by the conflict, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) warned today.

“To address increasing malnutrition levels, aid agencies have scaled up assistance and treated 97,000 children for severe acute malnutrition in the past six months, while 65,000 children have been treated for moderate acute malnutrition,” said Farhan Haq, Deputy Spokesman for the Secretary-General, briefing press at UN Headquarters.

Despite the challenging circumstances to delivery aid, “about 3.8 million children have received food supplements, and 933,000 pregnant and lactating women benefited from supplementary feeding,” according to UNICEF.

But UNICEF estimates that 537,000 children, or one out of eight children under age five, are now at risk of severe acute malnutrition in Yemen – a threefold increase from 160,000 in March when a long and complex political crisis in Yemen rapidly escalated into all-out conflict.

As the fighting has spread across the country, millions of civilians are suffering from the violence.

UNICEF also noted that “almost 1.3 million children under five are moderately malnourished compared with 690,000 children prior to the crisis.”

“Yemen’s alarming malnutrition levels are aggravated by the limited availability of, and lack of access to food, due to blocked or damaged delivery routes and restrictions on food and fuel imports,” UNICEF said, adding that fuel and water prices have surged and availability remains erratic.

Yemen is the worst country for civilian deaths and injuries from explosive weapon use in the first seven months of 2015, according to a recent UN humanitarian report produced by the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) and the charity Action on Armed Violence (AOAV).

Statement Attributable to Jeremy Hopkins, Acting UNICEF Representative in Yemen on increased attacks on civilians and civilian infrastructure

SANA’A, 18 September 2015

Vital water supplies intended to help 11,000 people in the worst conflict-affected areas of Yemen were destroyed yesterday in the bombing of a warehouse used by the agency for humanitarian supplies in Dhamar, south of Yemen’s capital, Sana’a.

“UNICEF is appalled by the destruction of these humanitarian supplies – which included jerry cans, water filters and water tanks. Such attacks only harm civilians, and cannot be justified.

“Across Yemen, since March this year, at least 466 children have been killed and another 658 were injured as a result of the intensive fighting.

“Attacks on civilians and infrastructure such as schools, hospitals, bridges and roads have become a common feature of the armed conflict in Yemen.

“Since the escalation of the conflict in March 2015, UNICEF was able to verify that 41 schools and 61 hospitals have been attacked or damaged as a result of the fighting.

“In Tai’z, where fighting has escalated in recent weeks, partners have reported that UNICEF humanitarian supplies, including medicines for children, have been confiscated by armed groups.

“UNICEF calls on all parties to the conflict in Yemen to refrain from attacking civilians and civilian infrastructure in accordance with international humanitarian law. All civilians including children should be protected at all times”.

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About UNICEF UNICEF promotes the rights and wellbeing of every child, in everything we do. Together with our partners, we work in 190 countries and territories to translate that commitment into practical action, focusing special effort on reaching the most vulnerable and excluded children, to the benefit of all children, everywhere. For more information about UNICEF and its work visit: www.unicef.org

Download multimedia content at: http://weshare.unicef.org/mediaresources

Follow us on https://twitter.com/UNICEF_Yemen and http://www.facebook.com/unicefyemen

For more information, please contact:

Rajat Madhok, UNICEF Yemen, Tel: +967 712223001, rmadhok@unicef.org

Juliette Touma, UNICEF Regional Office for the Middle East and North Africa, Tel: +962 79 867 4628,jtouma@unicef.org

Najwa Mekki, UNICEF New York, Tel: +1212 326 7448, nmekki@unicef.org

“They call me teacher”: Promoting better health in the midst of Yemen’s crisis

By Ansar Rasheed

As the humanitarian situation in Yemen continues to deteriorate, a volunteer provides vital health information and services to communities in desperate need of help.

AL HUSHA, Yemen, 17 August 2015 – Abdulghani Saeed has been busy recently. For the past several months, he has dedicated every spare moment to working with families desperate for health care.

Yemen’s health system, already fragile before fighting escalated in March, has been further distressed by conflict, and gaining access to people in need of assistance is a serious challenge. It is a catastrophic situation, with an estimated 21 million people – 80 percent of the population – in need of humanitarian assistance.

Putting his career as a district head of health education on hold, Abdulghani has taken up the crucial role of community volunteer. Supported by UNICEF and its partners, he leads a team of six volunteers delivering essential services and health information in his home district of Al Husha, in southern Yemen, where heavy clashes have led to a large influx of people.

Life-saving messages

A five-day training in Communication for Development (C4D) helped give Abdulghani the tools and information to engage with communities and enable people who have been displaced to protect their families’ health. He joins more than 1,400 community volunteers trained in disease prevention and management, essential nutrition, routine immunization and hygiene promotion. Volunteers also provide guidance on the use of chlorine for water purification and how to avoid injury and death by unexploded ordnance (UXO) – sadly essential knowledge in these times.

Abdulghani also helps link the villages he covers to services provided by mobile health units. “With my team, we cover 15 villages with our messages, including the use of posters and leaflets. We knock on doors and we talk with people,” he says. “Our team doesn’t just repeat messages – we help teach people to help themselves. By adopting good practices, they’ll save their children and hopefully their own lives as well.”

UNICEF has supported production of 35,000 information leaflets, covering 14 key behaviours. Distributed by the Ministry of Health and partners, as well as six radio stations, these messages are reaching close to 3 million people across Yemen.

Abdulghani is aware that the contributions of the community volunteers are essential to providing humanitarian assistance in these desperate times.

“My family is proud of me, and I have gained respect, especially from elderly people and women,” he says. “Now in my village they call me ‘Ustaz’ [teacher] Abdulghani.”

Checkpoints, water and the children of Yemen

On 11 May, a boy pushes a wheelbarrow filled with jerrycans in Sana’a, the capital. By 12 May 2015 in Yemen, escalating conflict continued to exact a heavy toll on children and their families. Some 300,000 people have been internally displaced. Casualties have reached 1,527, including 115 children, and 6,266 people have been injured, including 172 children. Prior to the current crisis, 15.9 million people – including 7.9 million children – were already in need of humanitarian assistance. Despite the challenging operating conditions, UNICEF is scaling up its humanitarian response, including in the areas of nutrition, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), health, child protection and education. Support since the start of the current conflict has included providing access to clean water to 604,360 people and access to antenatal, delivery and postnatal care to 3,386 pregnant women; distributing hygiene kits to 16,662 families; and sharing educational messaging on health, hygiene and protection to 38,000 people. UNICEF has appealed for US$88.1 million to cover these and other responses through December 2015; 87 per cent remains unfunded to date.

On 11 May, a boy pushes a wheelbarrow filled with jerrycans in Sana’a, the capital.
By 12 May 2015 in Yemen, escalating conflict continued to exact a heavy toll on children and their families. Some 300,000 people have been internally displaced. Casualties have reached 1,527, including 115 children, and 6,266 people have been injured, including 172 children. Prior to the current crisis, 15.9 million people – including 7.9 million children – were already in need of humanitarian assistance. Despite the challenging operating conditions, UNICEF is scaling up its humanitarian response, including in the areas of nutrition, water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH), health, child protection and education. Support since the start of the current conflict has included providing access to clean water to 604,360 people and access to antenatal, delivery and postnatal care to 3,386 pregnant women; distributing hygiene kits to 16,662 families; and sharing educational messaging on health, hygiene and protection to 38,000 people. UNICEF has appealed for US$88.1 million to cover these and other responses through December 2015; 87 per cent remains unfunded to date.

My job is to ensure that more people have access to water and sanitation in Yemen, one of the most water-scarce countries in the world. After less than a month there, I had to leave Sana’a, along with other international United Nations colleagues, because of the escalation in conflict.

It is now the holy month of Ramadan and I’m back in Sana’a. Although it feels good to be back, my return comes with mixed feelings. The lively and bustling city that I left just three months ago is now deserted, except for the kilometres-long lines of cars waiting for petrol and the garbage piled up on the streets. We drive past a checkpoint, where I see a boy with a rifle, clearly too young to be holding a weapon. A bit further down the road, people queue up at a mosque to fill their jerry cans with water. Desperation is visible in their eyes.

The conflict in Yemen has brought the country to the brink of a humanitarian catastrophe. A colleague describes it as “the straw that broke the camel’s back”. Schools, hospitals, roads and bridges are damaged, and public services have collapsed. Supplies of food, fuel and medicines are critically low, and the lack of safe water and proper sanitation poses serious health risks to millions of people.

It is clear that the people of Yemen are suffering and need urgent help. And that’s exactly why I came back. My team and I are working around the clock to provide children and their families affected by the conflict with clean water and basic hygiene kits that contain necessities like soap and jerry cans.

The United Nations estimates that 80 per cent of the population is in need of humanitarian assistance, a number that gives me goose bumps. But small things continue to inspire me, like the trucks on the streets of Sana’a that have started to collect garbage strewn all over, which has in part been possible because of UNICEF’s contribution of fuel to the local authorities. UNICEF is also providing fuel for over 10 cities in the country, to keep the pumps of the urban water systems operational, thereby reaching millions of people.

From time to time, emotions overwhelm me. Of course my heartbeat goes up when my bed shakes from the loud bombing nearby at night. But it affects me more when I get the news that a staff of one of our local partners was shot by a sniper while delivering water to a community, and another constructing latrines for displaced people was kidnapped for a week. At the same time, there are heroic stories of those involved in transporting supplies and fuel to pump water to areas where heavy conflict is ongoing, and where no assistance was able to reach before.

I feel a lot of respect for all of my Yemeni colleagues who continue to go out and serve those displaced while putting their lives at risk. Being back in Yemen has brought me closer to my team. I’ve begun to understand the difficult conditions people face every day, and that it hasn’t stopped us from planning big and going the extra mile. What if we could negotiate access to collect the solid waste in Aden, where a disease outbreak is looming? What if we could distribute hygiene kits to the people who are left behind in Sa’ada, because they have no means to leave the area?

Reaching these people is so important, because our biggest fear is that the children of Yemen won’t die of bullets and bombs, but of preventable diseases like diarrhoea and pneumonia. In addition to medical services and vaccinations, providing clean water, a toilet and a piece of soap can literally save a child’s life. Even if the conflict rages on, and we are denied access time and again, we will continue to try to reach out to those most in need. But most importantly, we will continue to hope that one day this conflict will end and peace will return to the people of Yemen.

Marije Broekhuijsen works in Yemen as a UNICEF Water, Sanitation and Hygiene specialist. This post was written during the month of Ramadan.

Yemen Conflict: Over a thousand child casualties so far – UNICEF

SANAA, 19 August 2015

 An average of eight children are being killed or maimed every day in Yemen as a direct result of the conflict gripping the country, according to a report released by UNICEF.

Yemen: Childhood Under Threat says that nearly 400 children have been killed and over 600 others injured since the violence escalated some four months ago.

Disrupted health services, increased levels of child malnutrition, closed schools and higher numbers of children recruited by fighting groups are among the effects of the conflict now ravaging the Arab world’s poorest country.

“This conflict is a particular tragedy for Yemeni children”, said UNICEF Representative in Yemen, Julien Harneis. “Children are being killed by bombs or bullets and those that survive face the growing threat of disease and malnutrition. This cannot be allowed to continue”, he added.

The report underlines that as devastating as the conflict is for the lives of children right now, it will have terrifying consequences for their future.

Across the country, nearly 10 million children – 80 per cent of the country’s under-18 population – are in need of urgent humanitarian assistance. More than 1.3 million people have been forced to flee their homes.

Yemen: Childhood Under Threat outlines the different dimensions of the crisis facing children including:

  • At least 398 children killed and 605 injured as a result since the conflict escalated in March.
  • Children recruited or used in the conflict has more than doubled – from 156 in 2014 to 377 so far verified in 2015.
  • 15.2 million people lack access to basic health care, with 900 health facilities closed since March 26.
  • 1.8 million children are likely to suffer from some form of malnutrition by the end of the year.
  • 20.4 million people are in need of assistance to establish or maintain access to safe water and sanitation due to fuel shortages, infrastructure damage and insecurity.
  • Nearly 3,600 schools have closed down, affecting over 1.8 million children.

UNICEF has been at the centre of humanitarian operations in Yemen since the beginning of the conflict. Its staff working across the country are responding to the critical needs of children by providing life-saving services including distribution of safe water and treatment of children with malnutrition, as well as diarrhoea, measles and pneumonia.

Over the past six months, the children’s agency has provided psychological support to help over 150,000 children cope with the horrors of the conflict. 280,000 people have learnt how to avoid injury from unexploded ordnances and mines.

Yet despite the tremendous needs, UNICEF’s response remains grossly underfunded. With only 16 per cent of the agency’s funding appeal of $182.6 million met so far, Yemen is one of the most under-funded of the different emergencies UNICEF is currently responding to around the world.

“We urgently need funds so we can reach children in desperate need,” said Harneis. “We cannot stand by and let children suffer the consequences of a humanitarian catastrophe.”

UNICEF reiterates its call on all parties to the conflict to respect their obligations under international humanitarian law and to stop targeting civilians and crucial infrastructure like schools, water and health facilities. UNICEF again emphasizes the urgent to end the conflict once and for all.

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Notes to the editor
About UNICEF:  UNICEF promotes the rights and wellbeing of every child, in everything we do.  Together with our partners, we work in 190 countries and territories to translate that commitment into practical action, focusing special effort on reaching the most vulnerable and excluded children, to the benefit of allchildren, everywhere.  For more information about UNICEF and its work visit:www.unicef.org

For further information, please contact:
Rajat Madhok, UNICEF Yemen, rmadhok@unicef.org  +967 712 223 001
Bismarck Swangin, UNICEF Yemen, bswangin@unicef.org +962 790 157 636
Simon Ingram, UNICEF Amman, singram@unicef.org  +962 6 550 2407
Rose Foley, UNICEF New York, rfoley@unicef.org, +1 917 340 2582