Secretary-General’s Message On World No Tobacco Day

New York , 31 May 2016

Cigarettes and other tobacco products kill almost 6 million people every year.  Sustainable Development Goal 3 aims to “Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages”.  As part of that approach, governments have committed to strengthen the implementation of the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control in all countries to reduce the proportion of people who use tobacco.

On World No Tobacco Day 2016, the United Nations is lending its support to one simple measure with proven effectiveness in reducing demand: the plain packaging of tobacco products.  As laid out in the UN tobacco control treaty, this entails restricting or prohibiting the use of logos, colours, brand images or any promotional information other than brand and product names displayed in a standard colour and font.

Tobacco use is one of the largest causes of preventable noncommunicable diseases, including cancers, heart and lung disease.  It also diverts valuable household income.  Plain packaging reduces the attractiveness of tobacco products, restricts tobacco advertising and promotion, limits misleading labeling, and increases the effectiveness of health warnings.

On this World No Tobacco Day, I call on governments around the world to get ready for plain packaging.

Yemen: ‘hope’ emanating from UN-sponsored talks, as details of peace agreement discussed

Yemen’s capital, Sana'a, in July 2015. Photo: OCHA/ Charlotte Cans

Yemen’s capital, Sana’a, in July 2015. Photo: OCHA/ Charlotte Cans

26 May 2016

The United Nations envoy for Yemen said today that hope is emanating from the ongoing peace talks for the country as the warring parties started discussing details of elements that would be included in a comprehensive agreement.

Speaking to reporters in Kuwait, where the UN-mediated Yemeni talks are taking place, Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed, the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen, stressed that Yemen is at a critical stage, with the economy in tatters, its infrastructure ruined, and the country’s social fabric disintegrating.

“The situation on the ground is dire but there is hope emanating from Kuwait,” he said, adding that only the participants in the talks can change the situation.

In brief, he said that the talks are ongoing, the international support is stronger than ever and the UN is determined to achieve a lasting peace and to solidify any agreement reached.

On Monday, a joint plenary session was held in which the leaders of both delegations renewed their commitment to dialogue to reach a political agreement, that is acceptable by all.

The Special Envoy convened a number of bilateral meetings with the delegations over the past few days, and discussed specifically the details and mechanisms of withdrawal, handover of weapons, resumption of political dialogue, restoration of state institutions and other matters that will be included in a comprehensive agreement.

The discussions also covered the importance of guarantees and reassurances to ensure the implementation of an agreement, he said. The parties have started to address specific and sensitive matters in detail based on the agreed reference points.

On the issue of prisoners, it was agreed that the relevant Committee will continue to work separately. Yesterday, representatives of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) came to Kuwait to brief the delegations on the roles and guidelines for prisoners release and exchange processes in war zones as well as the mechanisms of ICRC’s work in this area.

Also yesterday, the Special Envoy briefed the Security Council in a closed-session through video conference, giving an overview of the talks, the preliminary understandings reached and explained the compromises and solutions that are currently being considered. He also gave a summary of the support needed by his Office in order to facilitate the implementation of a peace agreement, including support for interim security arrangements.

The ongoing conflict has destroyed the country’s economic infrastructure and severely disrupted the functioning of state institutions. Last week saw a sharp devaluation of the Yemeni Riyal and an alarming decline of the resources and liquidity held by the country’s treasury.

In this regard, the Special Envoy proposed to the parties the creation of an “Economic Task Force” in the near future. This body would enlist the support of economic experts in order to manage the situation and take the necessary measures to save the economy.

The cessation of hostilities has led to a direct reduction in violence and allowed humanitarian agencies to deliver aid to most areas in Yemen. The delivery of aid, basic medical services, pharmaceutical supplies and drinking water has increased over the last few weeks. UN agencies, in coordination with their partners, are working on providing literacy and math classes for children.

“I am increasingly asked how long the talks will last. There is no time limit and we will stay as long as it takes,” he said, adding that a sustainable and inclusive agreement cannot be rushed.

Note to Correspondents: Statement by the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen, Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed

Kuwait, 26 May 2016

I wanted to meet you today in order to update you on the latest developments in the talks. It has been a long week of sessions, in which we discussed a wide range of issues. Some sessions were promising and others tense. In spite of all of the challenges we are facing, the United Nations remains deeply committed to finding a peaceful solution.

As you know, I visited Doha on Sunday, to take part in the 16th Doha Forum and participate in several meetings on Yemen. I was honoured to join a meeting between the UN Secretary-General, Ban Ki-Moon, His Excellency President Abd Rabbo Mansour Hadi and His Highness Sheikh Tamim Bin Hamad Al Thani, the Emir of Qatar. The Secretary-General told them that peace negotiations were rarely smooth and there was a need for commitment and perseverance by all sides. The Secretary-General said that, in parallel to the peace talks, all parties needed to redouble their efforts to provide and facilitate unhindered humanitarian access to alleviate the appalling living conditions of millions of Yemeni citizens.  President Hadi reaffirmed his government’s readiness to work for peace and overcome the obstacles on the path to a peaceful solution. The Emir expressed his country’s eagerness to support the Yemeni talks to achieve a sustainable peace. During the meeting, I highlighted the need to provide a conducive environment by strengthening the commitment from all sides to the Cessation of Hostilities and by undertaking measure to build confidence between the parties.

The efforts of the leadership of Kuwait, Qatar and the UN Secretary-General had a positive impact and led to the return of the Government of Yemen’s delegation to the joint sessions. On Monday, a joint plenary session was held in which the leaders of both delegations renewed their commitment to dialogue to reach a political agreement, that is acceptable by all.

I convened a number of bilateral meetings with the delegations over the past few days. We discussed specifically the details and mechanisms of withdrawal, handover of weapons, resumption of political dialogue, restoration of state institutions and other matters that will be included in a comprehensive agreement. The discussions also covered the importance of guarantees and reassurances to ensure the implementation of an agreement.

At this juncture of the talks, the parties have started to address specific and sensitive matters in detail based on the agreed reference points. It was agreed that the prisoners’ committee will continue to work separately. The committee was reinforced by human rights experts from both sides. Yesterday, representatives of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) came to Kuwait at the invitation of my office. They met bilaterally with the delegations to brief them on the roles and guidelines for prisoners release and exchange processes in war zones and the mechanisms of ICRC’s work in this area.

Yesterday, I briefed the Security Council in a closed-session through video conference. During the session, I gave an overview of the talks, the preliminary understandings reached and I explained the compromises and solutions that are currently being considered.  I also gave a summary of the support needed by my Office in order to facilitate the implementation of a peace agreement including support for interim security arrangements.

The representatives of Ansarullah and the General People’s Congress (GPC) in the De-escalation and Coordination Committee (DCC), have returned to their duties after a one-day suspension. The DCC continues to work with dedication, are we are working with the team to provide additional technical support.

In brief, the talks are ongoing, the international support is stronger than ever and the United Nations is determined to achieve a lasting peace and to solidify any agreement reached.

Economic Situation
The ongoing conflict has destroyed the country’s economic infrastructure and severely disrupted the functioning of state institutions, causing the suffering of many civilians. Failure to address the issue will lead to further deterioration of the economic situation. Last week witnessed a sharp devaluation of the Yemeni Riyal and an alarming decline of the resources and liquidity held by the country’s treasury. The continuation of this trend will lead to a rapid increase in inflation and negatively affect the humanitarian and social situation. In this regard, I proposed to the parties the creation of an “Economic Task Force” in the near future. The committee would enlist the support of economic experts in order to manage the situation and take the necessary measures to save the economy. As an urgent first step, I call on the Yemeni parties and the international community to support the Social Welfare Fund.  The fund would include direct financial support to the most affected segments of society, inject liquidity into the country, ease the pressure on the Central Bank, and help alleviate suffering.

The cessation of hostilities has led to a direct reduction in violence and allowed humanitarian agencies to deliver aid to most areas in Yemen. The delivery of aid, basic medical services, pharmaceutical supplies and drinking water have increased over the last few weeks.  UN agencies, in coordination with their partners, are working on providing literacy and math classes for children.

The parties must assume their responsibility towards the nation. We are at a dangerous crossroads. One path leads us to stability. If the parties do not provide the required concessions, the situation on the ground would significantly worsen. As we are approaching Ramadan, we hope that the parties will undertake tangible steps towards alleviating the economic suffering of the people, the release of prisoners and detainees, and the implementation of the cessation of hostilities.

I am increasingly asked how long will the talks last. There is no time limit and we will stay as long as it takes.  The crisis in Yemen has to end as soon as possible; as soon as possible. We urge the participants in the talks to re-double their efforts to reach a peace agreement.  It takes time to end conflict.  A sustainable and inclusive agreement cannot be rushed.  It is now up to the parties to decide.
I want to take this opportunity to thank again the Emir of Kuwait, His Highness Sheikh Sabah al Ahmed al Jaber Al-Sabah, for Kuwait’s role in hosting the talks. I also applaud the efforts of the international community who consistently demonstrate unprecedented unity and endless support for the efforts of the UN.

Yemen is at a critical stage. The economy is in tatters, its infrastructure ruined, and the country’s social fabric is disintegrating. The situation on the ground is dire but there is hope emanating from Kuwait. Only a political settlement will restore hope. The participants in the talks are the only ones who can change the situation in Yemen.

إسماعيل ولد الشيخ أحمد: المحادثات اليمنية معقدة وصعبة، لكنها تقربنا إلى اتفاق شامل

الصورة: الأمم المتحدة/JC McIlwaine

الصورة: الأمم المتحدة/JC McIlwaine

25 مايو 2016 – إذاعة الأمم المتحدة

إستماع

ذكر المتحدث باسم الأمم المتحدة، فرحان حق، أن المبعوث الأممي الخاص لليمن، إسماعيل ولد الشيخ أحمد، يقدم إحاطة إلى مجلس الأمن الدولي اليوم الأربعاء، عبر دائرة تلفزيونية مغلقة، حول التقدم المحرز في المحادثات اليمنية التي تجري في الكويت.

وكان ولد الشيخ أحمد قد عقد يوم الاثنين لقاءات ثنائية مع وفد حكومة اليمن.

وعقب هذه الاجتماعات، صرح المبعوث الخاص بأن المشاركين في المحادثات يسيرون نحو فهم عام يشمل توقعات ورؤى الطرفين، كما أوضح فرحان حق في المؤتمر الصحفي اليومي بالمقر الدائم:

“قال إنه يعمل الآن على التغلب على مختلف العقبات ومعالجة التفاصيل المحددة لآلية التنفيذ. إن المناقشات معقدة وصعبة، لكنها تقربنا إلى اتفاق شامل.”

IOM Responds to Needs of Recently Displaced Families in Lahj Governorate, Yemen

IOM DTM Team in Yemen assessing and monitoring IDP households in Tuban district in Lahj. Photo: IOM 2016

IOM DTM Team in Yemen assessing and monitoring IDP households in Tuban district in Lahj. Photo: IOM 2016

20 May 2016 – Yemen

Since February, ground clashes in bordering areas of Lahj and Taizz governorates in Yemen have forced hundreds of families out of their homes and villages to seek safety away from their homes of habitual residence.

Recently, through IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM), IOM field staff identified 80 households that have fled to areas in Tur Al Baha district, Lahj, and 35 households to Tuban district, Lahj.

IOM field teams, comprised of shelter/non-food items (NFIs) and DTM teams, conducted rapid assessments and revealed the most urgent needs of these IDP families to be shelter/NFIs along with water and sanitation and hygiene (WASH) assistance.

This week, IOM shelter/NFIs teams distributed kits to 30 of the most vulnerable households in Tur Al Baha District with further transportation and distribution of another 85 Shelter and NFI kits comprising of mattresses, blankets, kitchen sets, sleeping mats, jerry cans, plastic sheets, and rope scheduled for early next week in Tur Al Baha and Tuban District.

Recently arrived Chief of Mission for IOM Yemen, Laurent De Boeck, said: “In adherence to the humanitarian principles, IOM remains committed to meet the needs of the most vulnerable affected populations, as displacement continues to touch numerous families throughout the country, and the humanitarian situation remains dire. IOM is taking all possible measures to continue serving the people of Yemen and provide direct relief in close cooperation with its national and international partners.”

Since the beginning of the crisis, IOM has assisted 834 internally displaced persons (IDPs) and families (approximately 5,838 individuals) in Tur Al Baha, Madarebah Wa Ras El Arah, Al Qabbaitah and Karish districts of Lahj govenorates.

In December 2015, IOM assisted the Local Corporation for Water and Sanitation through procuring and replacing seven water pumps in Tuban District, benefitting approximately 33,838 individuals. IOM has been assisting IDPs in Lahj governorate with a daily supply of water and the distribution of family water tanks and dignity kits.

Since 26 March 2015, IOM has assisted a total 63,709 IDPs in Aden, Abyan, Lahj, Hadhramaut, Shabwah, Al Dhale’e, Sa’ada, Taizz, Al Maharah and Socotra governorates through shelter and NFI support. A total of 634,596 IDPs and conflict-affected persons (266,530 women, 285,568 men, 44,422 girls and 38,076 boys) have benefitted from IOM’s WASH activities in Abyan, Aden, Al Dhale’e, Al Jawf, Hadhramaut, Ibb, Taizz Lahj, Sana’a and Shabwah governorates. On average, 15 litres of water per person per day is provided by IOM.

IOM Yemen’s Emergency Response is funded by OFDA (US), DFID (UK) and Japan. IOM is seeking additional funding to expand its operations to respond to the needs of the most vulnerable affected populations in Yemen.

For further information, please contact Saba Malme, IOM Yemen, Tel: + 967 1 410 568, Email: smalme@iom.int

Secretary-General’s message on the Day of Vesak

New York, 20 May 2016

At this time of mass population movements, violent conflicts, atrocious human rights abuses and hateful rhetoric aimed at dividing communities, the sacred commemoration of the Day of Vesak offers an invaluable opportunity to reflect on how the teachings of Buddhism can help the international community tackle pressing challenges.

The fundamental equality of all people, the imperative to seek justice, and the interdependence of life and the environment are more than abstract concepts for scholars to debate; they are living guidelines for Buddhists and others navigating the path to a better future.

One Sutra tells the story of Srimala, a woman who pledged to help all those suffering from injustice, illness, poverty or disaster. This spirit of solidarity can animate our global efforts to realize the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, carry out the Paris Agreement on climate change, and promote human rights while advancing human dignity worldwide.

The actions of Srimala also illustrate the primary role that women can play in advocating for peace, justice and human rights. Gender equality and the empowerment of women remain urgent priorities that will drive progress across the international agenda.

In just a few days, the United Nations will convene the first-ever World Humanitarian Summit, where leaders will join activists and other partners to address the needs of millions of vulnerable people in crisis.  Buddhists and individuals of all faiths who are concerned about the future of humanity can help advance the Summit’s aims to uphold humanitarian law, protect civilians in conflict, and improve the global response to emergencies.

On this Day of Vesak, let us pledge to reach out to bridge differences, foster a sense of belonging, and show compassion on a global scale for the sake of our common future.

Secretary-General’s message to First World Conference on Tourism for Development

Beijing, China, 18 May 2016

Your Excellency President Xi Jinping, Mr. Li Jinzao, Chair of the China National Tourism Administration, Mr. Taleb Rifai, Secretary-General of the World Tourism Organization, Excellencies, Distinguished guests, Ladies and Gentlemen,

I am delighted to greet all the participants of the First World Conference on Tourism for Development. I thank the Government of the People’s Republic of China for hosting this inaugural conference with the World Tourism Organization.

This is the first high-level international meeting on tourism and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, the universal, integrated and transformative agenda that aims to spur actions that end poverty and build a more sustainable world over the next 15 years.

Three of the Sustainable Development Goals – Goal 8 on promoting growth and decent work, SDG 12 on sustainable consumption and production, and SDG 14 on the conservation of marine resources — have targets that specifically relate to tourism.

But tourism cuts across so many different areas of life, and involves so many different economic sectors and socio-cultural currents, that it is connected to the entire agenda. As we begin implementation, this is a crucial moment for you, the leaders of the tourism sector, to commit to this universal agenda for people and planet.

Tourism has immense capacity to generate growth for all nations and it has proven resilient in the face of external shocks.

In many Least Developed Countries, tourism is among the top three sources of foreign exchange earnings. It is a highly effective way for many of the world’s poorest countries to take a more active part in the global economy.

When tourism is well-managed, it has tremendous capacity to create decent jobs, provide opportunities for inclusion and education, and contribute to preserving cultural heritage and the environment.

Tourism also has an important role in building cross-cultural understanding and fostering peace between highly diverse communities.

Every day more than three million tourists cross borders around the world. Each of them is a potential ambassador to another culture. Tourism can build bridges, dismantle preconceptions and encourage tolerance and curiosity, instead of ignorance and bias.

As we prepare to celebrate 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development, I encourage you to make the best possible use of tourism to build a safer, more inclusive, more prosperous and sustainable world.

I wish you a fruitful and productive conference.

Thank you.

Yemeni people must be at centre of reinvigorated crisis response – senior UN relief official

On the road to Qatabir, Yemen, many bridges have been damaged, making life hard for everyone including distribution. Photo: OCHA Yemen/Jamie McGoldrick

On the road to Qatabir, Yemen, many bridges have been damaged, making life hard for everyone including distribution. Photo: OCHA Yemen/Jamie McGoldrick

17 May 2016

A senior United Nations relief official today called for increased global efforts to support the more than 13 million people in need of immediate, life-saving assistance in Yemen, following his visit to the conflict-torn country.

“Seeing the plight of the Yemeni people first-hand reinforces the need for national and international humanitarian actors to scale up their response to protect and support the population,” John Ging, Director of Operations in the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), told reporters in New York.

Mr. Ging appealed for an urgent increase in attention and support for the Yemen Humanitarian Response Plan, which requires $1.8 billion this year, but remains “shockingly underfunded” at only 16 per cent.

He undertook his three-day visit with Emergency Director of the World Health Organization (WHO), Rick Brennan, and Deputy Emergency Director of the World Food Programme (WFP), Gian Carlo Cirri.

They visited a food distribution site in Amran, a small city in western central Yemen where a high number of internally displaced people are living in difficult conditions as a result of the crisis.

Since mid-March 2015, the conflict has prompted a widening protection crisis, exacerbating an already dire humanitarian situation brought on by years of poverty, poor governance and instability. Over 7.6 million people are severely food insecure, and 2.5 million people have been displaced by violent conflict since January 2014.

Mr. Ging made a crucial appeal to the parties of the conflict to prioritize the protection of civilians and civilian needs, and to swiftly enable unhindered humanitarian access by lifting the blockade so that humanitarian actors have sustained, unhindered and safe access to all people in need, particularly in the governorates of Taiz, Hajjah, Sa’ada, Aden and Al Jawf.

“The people of Yemen must be at the centre of this response, and our collective duty is to protect them and provide them with food, health, shelter and other vital support,” said Mr. Ging.

He noted that people are dying of preventable illnesses because of the limited availability of even the most basic medical supplies.

Last year, the humanitarian community delivered vital assistance to 8.8 million women, children and men across the country despite severe restrictions on humanitarian movement and on-going conflict, making all support, including the transportation of goods, difficult and often dangerous.

OCHA Operations Director warns of consequences of shockingly low funding for Yemen humanitarian crisis, which demands urgent international attention

New York, 17 May 2016

After a three-day joint visit to Yemen by OCHA, WHO and WFP, John Ging, Director of Operations in the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, today drew urgent attention to the desperate humanitarian situation in Yemen, which continues to deteriorate more than a year after the conflict escalated.

Since mid-March 2015, the conflict has prompted a widening protection crisis, exacerbating an already dire humanitarian situation brought on by years of poverty, poor governance and instability, leaving more than 13 million Yemenis in need of immediate, life-saving humanitarian assistance.

“Millions of people in Yemen are in increasingly dire need of assistance,” warned Mr. Ging, pointing out that food and nutrition, insecurity and access to healthcare are among the most critical areas of need. “People are dying of preventable illnesses because of the limited availability of even the most basic medical supplies.” Over 7.6 million people are severely food insecure, and 2.5 million people have been displaced by violent conflict since January 2014. “The continued conflict, months of limited imports of essential supplies, and rapidly deteriorating basic services are deepening humanitarian needs,” Mr. Ging told media in New York.

Last year the humanitarian community delivered vital assistance to 8.8 million women, children and men across the country despite severe restrictions on humanitarian movement and on-going conflict, making all humanitarian support, including the transportation of goods, difficult and often dangerous.

During the visit, Mr. Ging, with the Emergency Director of WHO, Rick Brennan, and the Deputy Emergency Director of WFP, Gian Carlo Cirri, visited a food distribution site in Amran, a small city in western central Yemen where a high number of internally displaced people are living in very difficult conditions as a result of the crisis. “Seeing the plight of the Yemeni people first hand reinforces the need for national and international humanitarian actors to scale up their response to protect and support the population,” he said.

Commending national and international humanitarian organizations for their exhaustive and brave work under the leadership of the Humanitarian Coordinator, Jamie McGoldrick, John Ging noted that, “Yemen is one of the most acute humanitarian crises in the world, and the courageous and impressive work of the humanitarian staff is truly inspiring.”

Mr. Ging made a crucial appeal to the parties of the conflict to prioritize the protection of civilians and civilian needs, and to swiftly enable unhindered humanitarian access by lifting the blockade so that humanitarian actors have sustained, unhindered and safe access to all people in need, particularly in the governorates of Taizz, Hajjah, Sa’ada, Aden and Al Jawf. “The people of Yemen must be at the centre of this response, and our collective duty is to protect them and provide them with food, health, shelter and other vital support,” said Mr. Ging.

To the donor community, Mr. Ging appealed for an urgent increase in attention and support for the Yemen Humanitarian Response Plan, which requires US$1.8 billion to reach over 13 million people this year, but remains shockingly underfunded at only 16 per cent.

For further information, please call:
Amanda Pitt, OCHA New York, pitta@un.org, Tel. +1 917 442 18
OCHA press releases are available at www.unocha.org or reliefweb.int

رسالة بمناسبة الاحتفال باليوم العالمي للاتصالات ومجتمع المعلومات 17 أيار/مايو 2016

         يُركّز المجتمع الدولي جلَّ اهتمامه الآن على خطة التنمية المستدامة لعام 2030 التي تُسلِّم بالإمكانات الكبيرة التي تنطوي عليها تكنولوجيا المعلومات والاتصالات في تسريع التقدم البشري، وسدّ الفجوة الرقمية، والنهوض بالمعارف. وتدعو أهداف التنمية المستدامة السبعة عشر خصيصاً إلى توظيف تكنولوجيا المعلومات والاتصالات لتحقيق الرؤية الشاملة بأن يعيش جميع الناس حياة كريمة.

          وتُوفِّر هذه التقنيات الحلولَ الذكيَّة للتصدي للتحدِّيات الناشئة عن تغير المناخ، والجوع، والفقر، وغيرها من التحديات العالمية. وهي تُمثِّل الأدوات الأساسية لتوفير الرعاية الصحية المتنقلة، والحصول على التعليم، وتمكين المرأة، وتحسين أوجه  الكفاءة في الإنتاج الصناعي والزراعي، وحماية البيئة.

          وتُمثِّل مراكز التكنولوجيا المبتدئة في قطاع تكنولوجيا المعلومات والاتصالات المحركات الكفيلة بإيجاد الحلول المبتكرة والعملية التي يمكن أن تسهم في تحقيق النمو الشامل. وتُشكِّل الشركات الصغيرة والمتوسطة الحجم أكثر من 90 في المائة من مجموع الشركات في جميع أنحاء العالم، وتُمثِّل طريقاً للانعتاق من ربقة الفقر في العديد من البلدان النامية.

          ويُتقن الشباب بوجه خاص استخدام تكنولوجيا المعلومات والاتصالات. ولهذا، ينبغي للقادة أن يستثمروا مواهب المبدعين منهم لكونهم يُشكّلون جزءاً من أكبر جيل من الشباب عدداً في التاريخ. وهُم كمُنظِّمي مشاريع حرّة يمكن أن يكونوا روّاداً في مجال التكنولوجيا التحويلية، وأن يسهموا في خلق فرص العمل، وأن يجلبوا منافع لاقتصادات بأكملها.

          وإنّي أدعو الحكومات والشركات وقادة المجتمع المدني إلى تطوير تكنولوجيات جديدة ذات تأثير اجتماعي دائم. فبإمكان تكنولوجيا المعلومات والاتصالات أن تخلق مجتمعات أقدر على شمول الأشخاص ذوي الإعاقة. وبإمكانها أيضاً أن تُساعد الأطفال على التعلم وأن تُبقي كبار السن نشيطين. وبإمكان تكنولوجيا المعلومات والاتصالات كذلك أن تجمع الناس في جميع أنحاء العالم حول قضية مشتركة.

وفي هذا اليوم، اليوم العالمي للاتصالات ومجتمع المعلومات، دعونا نعقد العزم على تسخير قوة التكنولوجيا في خلق مستقبل أفضل للجميع.